Acute aerobic exercise improves memory across intensity and fitness levels

Krystle Zuniga, Mackenzie Mueller, Andrew R. Santana, William L. Kelemen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study was designed to examine the impact of exercise intensity and aerobic fitness on free recall, judgments of learning (JOLs), and metacognitive accuracy. In Experiment 1, 30 college students engaged in either (1) no exercise, (2) light exercise (55% of predicted maximal heart rate), or (3) moderate exercise (75% of predicted maximal heart rate) on three different days. In Experiment 2, 29 high-fit students (VO2 max ≥ 70th percentile) and 28 low-fit students (VO2 max ≤ 50th percentile) completed sedentary and light exercise conditions. In both experiments, free recall scores significantly increased in the exercise conditions compared with the sedentary condition, but JOL magnitude and metacognitive accuracy were largely unaffected. These results demonstrate that exercise can improve recall at both light and high intensities, and that the benefit can be obtained by individuals regardless of their fitness level.

LanguageEnglish (US)
JournalMemory
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Exercise
Students
Light
Heart Rate
Learning
Fitness
Experiment
Free Recall
Judgments of Learning

Keywords

  • aerobic exercise
  • fitness
  • judgments of learning (JOLs)
  • metacognition
  • Recall

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Acute aerobic exercise improves memory across intensity and fitness levels. / Zuniga, Krystle; Mueller, Mackenzie; Santana, Andrew R.; Kelemen, William L.

In: Memory, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zuniga, Krystle ; Mueller, Mackenzie ; Santana, Andrew R. ; Kelemen, William L. / Acute aerobic exercise improves memory across intensity and fitness levels. In: Memory. 2018.
@article{5ee1f1c2e16b48bdb3b6f51d456b4bcd,
title = "Acute aerobic exercise improves memory across intensity and fitness levels",
abstract = "The present study was designed to examine the impact of exercise intensity and aerobic fitness on free recall, judgments of learning (JOLs), and metacognitive accuracy. In Experiment 1, 30 college students engaged in either (1) no exercise, (2) light exercise (55{\%} of predicted maximal heart rate), or (3) moderate exercise (75{\%} of predicted maximal heart rate) on three different days. In Experiment 2, 29 high-fit students (VO2 max ≥ 70th percentile) and 28 low-fit students (VO2 max ≤ 50th percentile) completed sedentary and light exercise conditions. In both experiments, free recall scores significantly increased in the exercise conditions compared with the sedentary condition, but JOL magnitude and metacognitive accuracy were largely unaffected. These results demonstrate that exercise can improve recall at both light and high intensities, and that the benefit can be obtained by individuals regardless of their fitness level.",
keywords = "aerobic exercise, fitness, judgments of learning (JOLs), metacognition, Recall",
author = "Krystle Zuniga and Mackenzie Mueller and Santana, {Andrew R.} and Kelemen, {William L.}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/09658211.2018.1546875",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Memory",
issn = "0965-8211",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acute aerobic exercise improves memory across intensity and fitness levels

AU - Zuniga, Krystle

AU - Mueller, Mackenzie

AU - Santana, Andrew R.

AU - Kelemen, William L.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - The present study was designed to examine the impact of exercise intensity and aerobic fitness on free recall, judgments of learning (JOLs), and metacognitive accuracy. In Experiment 1, 30 college students engaged in either (1) no exercise, (2) light exercise (55% of predicted maximal heart rate), or (3) moderate exercise (75% of predicted maximal heart rate) on three different days. In Experiment 2, 29 high-fit students (VO2 max ≥ 70th percentile) and 28 low-fit students (VO2 max ≤ 50th percentile) completed sedentary and light exercise conditions. In both experiments, free recall scores significantly increased in the exercise conditions compared with the sedentary condition, but JOL magnitude and metacognitive accuracy were largely unaffected. These results demonstrate that exercise can improve recall at both light and high intensities, and that the benefit can be obtained by individuals regardless of their fitness level.

AB - The present study was designed to examine the impact of exercise intensity and aerobic fitness on free recall, judgments of learning (JOLs), and metacognitive accuracy. In Experiment 1, 30 college students engaged in either (1) no exercise, (2) light exercise (55% of predicted maximal heart rate), or (3) moderate exercise (75% of predicted maximal heart rate) on three different days. In Experiment 2, 29 high-fit students (VO2 max ≥ 70th percentile) and 28 low-fit students (VO2 max ≤ 50th percentile) completed sedentary and light exercise conditions. In both experiments, free recall scores significantly increased in the exercise conditions compared with the sedentary condition, but JOL magnitude and metacognitive accuracy were largely unaffected. These results demonstrate that exercise can improve recall at both light and high intensities, and that the benefit can be obtained by individuals regardless of their fitness level.

KW - aerobic exercise

KW - fitness

KW - judgments of learning (JOLs)

KW - metacognition

KW - Recall

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85057326874&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85057326874&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09658211.2018.1546875

DO - 10.1080/09658211.2018.1546875

M3 - Article

JO - Memory

T2 - Memory

JF - Memory

SN - 0965-8211

ER -