Cultural appropriation and the crafting of racialized selves in American youth organizations: Toward an ethnographic approach

Pauline Turner Strong

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

    • 4 Citations

    Abstract

    This article considers three moments in the history of Camp Fire, the first American multiracial organization for girls: (1) the foundation of the organization in the 1910s through the 1930s by progressive reformers heavily influenced by ethnological scholarship on Native American rituals and symbolism; (2) the transformation of the organization into a coeducational organization in the 1970s; and (3) current efforts in the organization, now known as Camp Fire USA, to bring its activities more in line with contemporary multiculturalism while retaining its "Indiang" traditions as the organization's heritage. These three historical moments are explored through a combination of archival research, interviews, and participant-observation. As a case study, the history of Camp Fire offers the opportunity to (1) deepen our knowledge of the American tradition of "playing Indian" and (2) track changes and continuities in the relationship among race, culture, gender, and sexuality in U.S. informal education.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Pages197-213
    Number of pages17
    JournalCultural Studies - Critical Methodologies
    Volume9
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2009

    Fingerprint

    Ethnographic
    Cultural Appropriation
    Crafting
    youth organization
    organization
    History
    history
    Sexuality
    1930s
    Multiculturalism
    Informal Education
    Native Americans
    1910s
    Reformer
    Heritage
    1970s
    Archival Research
    Continuity
    Research Interviews
    American Tradition

    Keywords

    • Cultural appropriation
    • Hybrid traditions
    • Playing Indian
    • Racial mimesis
    • Whiteness

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cultural Studies

    Cite this

    Cultural appropriation and the crafting of racialized selves in American youth organizations : Toward an ethnographic approach. / Strong, Pauline Turner.

    In: Cultural Studies - Critical Methodologies, Vol. 9, No. 2, 2009, p. 197-213.

    Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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