Dress for success - Does primping pay?

Daniel S Hamermesh, Xin Meng, Junsen Zhang

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    • 52 Citations

    Abstract

    Combining labor-market information, appraisals of respondents' beauty, and household expenditures allows us to examine within a unified framework the relative magnitudes of investment and consumption components in one activity, women's spending on beauty-enhancing goods and services. We find that beauty raises women's earnings adjusted for a wide range of controls. Additional spending on clothing and cosmetics has a generally positive marginal impact on a woman's perceived beauty. The relative sizes of these effects demonstrate that such purchases pay back no more than 15% of additional unit of expenditure in the form of higher earnings. Most such spending seems to represent consumption.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Pages361-373
    Number of pages13
    JournalLabour Economics
    Volume9
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 10 2002

    Fingerprint

    Household expenditure
    Market information
    Payback
    Expenditure
    Purchase
    Labour market

    Keywords

    • Beauty
    • Beauty expenditure
    • Earnings

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Economics and Econometrics

    Cite this

    Hamermesh, D. S., Meng, X., & Zhang, J. (2002). Dress for success - Does primping pay? Labour Economics, 9(3), 361-373. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0927-5371(02)00014-3

    Dress for success - Does primping pay? / Hamermesh, Daniel S; Meng, Xin; Zhang, Junsen.

    In: Labour Economics, Vol. 9, No. 3, 10.07.2002, p. 361-373.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Hamermesh, DS, Meng, X & Zhang, J 2002, 'Dress for success - Does primping pay?' Labour Economics, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 361-373. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0927-5371(02)00014-3
    Hamermesh, Daniel S ; Meng, Xin ; Zhang, Junsen. / Dress for success - Does primping pay?. In: Labour Economics. 2002 ; Vol. 9, No. 3. pp. 361-373.
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