Episodic memory and Pavlovian conditioning: ships passing in the night

Joseph Dunsmoor, Marijn CW Kroes

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Research on emotional learning and memory is traditionally approached from one of two directions: episodic memory and classical conditioning. These approaches differ substantially in methodology and intellectual tradition. Here, we offer a new approach to the study of emotional memory in humans that involves integrating theoretical knowledge and experimental techniques from these seemingly distinct fields. Specifically, we describe how subtle modifications to traditional Pavlovian conditioning procedures have provided new insight into how emotional experiences are selectively prioritized in long-term episodic memory. We also speculate on future directions and undeveloped lines of research where some of the knowledge and principles of classical conditioning might advance our understanding of how emotion modifies episodic memory, and vice versa.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages32-39
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
Volume26
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Episodic Memory
Ships
Classical Conditioning
Long-Term Memory
Research
Emotions
Learning
Conditioning (Psychology)
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Episodic memory and Pavlovian conditioning : ships passing in the night. / Dunsmoor, Joseph; Kroes, Marijn CW.

In: Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, Vol. 26, 01.04.2019, p. 32-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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