Informational properties of anxiety and sadness, and displaced coping

Rajagopal Raghunathan, Michel T. Pham, Kim P. Corfman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    • 79 Citations

    Abstract

    Replicating Raghunathan and Pham (1999), results from two experiments confirm that while anxiety triggers a preference for options that are safer and provide a sense of control, sadness triggers a preference for options that are more rewarding and comforting. Results also indicate that these effects are driven by an affect-as-information process and are most pervasive when the source of anxiety or sadness is not salient. Finally, our results document a previously unrecognized phenomenon we term displaced coping, wherein affective states whose source is salient influence decisions that are seemingly-but not directly-related to the source of these affective states.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Pages596-601
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Consumer Research
    Volume32
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

    Fingerprint

    coping
    anxiety
    information process
    experiment
    Anxiety
    Affective
    Salient
    Trigger
    Experiment

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Business and International Management
    • Anthropology
    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
    • Economics and Econometrics
    • Marketing

    Cite this

    Informational properties of anxiety and sadness, and displaced coping. / Raghunathan, Rajagopal; Pham, Michel T.; Corfman, Kim P.

    In: Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.03.2006, p. 596-601.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Raghunathan, Rajagopal ; Pham, Michel T. ; Corfman, Kim P. / Informational properties of anxiety and sadness, and displaced coping. In: Journal of Consumer Research. 2006 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 596-601.
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