Social exchange from the supervisor's perspective: Employee trustworthiness as a predictor of interpersonal and informational justice

Cindy P. Zapata, Jesse E. Olsen, Luis D l Martins

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    • 28 Citations

    Abstract

    Using social exchange theory, we argue that because supervisors tend to value employee trustworthiness, they will be more likely to adhere to interpersonal and informational justice rules with trustworthy employees. Given social exchange theory's assumption that benefits are voluntary in nature, we propose that the benevolence and integrity facets of trustworthiness will be more likely to engender social exchange relationships than the ability facet. Specifically, we propose that employees seen as having high benevolence and integrity engender feelings of obligation and trust from their direct supervisors, increasing the likelihood that these supervisors will adhere to interpersonal and informational justice rules, which in turn influences employee perceptions of justice. We find partial support for our mediated model using a field sample.

    LanguageEnglish (US)
    Pages1-12
    Number of pages12
    JournalOrganizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
    Volume121
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - May 1 2013

    Fingerprint

    Social Justice
    Beneficence
    Aptitude
    Emotions
    Informational justice
    Interpersonal justice
    Predictors
    Supervisors
    Employees
    Trustworthiness
    Social exchange
    Social Theory
    Integrity
    Benevolence
    Social exchange theory

    Keywords

    • Benevolence
    • Fairness
    • Informational justice
    • Integrity
    • Interpersonal justice
    • Organizational justice
    • Social exchange
    • Trustworthiness

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Applied Psychology
    • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

    Cite this

    Social exchange from the supervisor's perspective : Employee trustworthiness as a predictor of interpersonal and informational justice. / Zapata, Cindy P.; Olsen, Jesse E.; Martins, Luis D l.

    In: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Vol. 121, No. 1, 01.05.2013, p. 1-12.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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